Hot water, wood drying


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Please. Hot water. Boiled water should be too hot to use until cooled down or give a heat bonus (especially with a thermos implemented eventually :P).

It can then be used for various things : Easier ice breaking, other yet unknown functionality, etc.

Also, sticks and wood in general should not be usable immediately if salvaged outside. It should be "cured" around fire or at least inside a house, to dry it out, prior to being usable for fire, or at least to make it viable as a starter. Maybe wet wood could have -40% chance of starting a fire or something, but still add a similar amount of power to the fire.

This would force people to use reclaimed wood first or indoor wood in general a lot more than currently.

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I like the wet wood idea, but I think it should be tuned to make the game harder long term, not just make the beginning harder. How about this: Each building with a stove/fireplace/fire barrel has a "wood bin" for firewood. It would work just like any other container, and when searched should yield just enough dry wood to get you through the first few days and the amount present depends on game difficulty i.e. 10-12 pieces on pilgrim, 4-7 on Voyageur 0-3 on stalker.

From personal experience, wet wood doesn't burn for beans! It will burn, but you need a hot fire and it doesn't put out near the heat dry wood does.

Sam

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Wet wood might be tough to light, but green wood would be a far bigger problem. The sticks from the ground here aren't going to be very wet or very green - they're dried out old things, in extremely dry conditions. Cold air is dry dry dry! You know how your lips get chapped in cold snowy winters? That's because the air is so dry it's leaching the moisture right out of your skin. The sort of artic cold in the game absolutely leaches the moisture out of the air, and in turn from things like fallen branches. I've started plenty of fires with sticks found on the ground outside, in snowy conditions, wet conditions, and otherwise.

Even wood that has been rained on or sat in melting snow is going to be pretty much dry on the inside unless you left it for extended periods of time in the damp - just split it in half and burn away - the dry interior burning will rapidly remove the small amount of water on the outside. I could see giving a bonus to the initial firestarting chance or the initial heat output if using "dried" wood, but the idea that wood wouldn't burn unless and until its been dried out is just not remotely correct. We already need a hatchet to break up our firewood from limbs, and the graphic clearly shows the bark has been removed from the prepared logs - exposing that inside in this manner is all you really need to do to make it functional.

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