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On Wednesdays we've been sharing quotes on our social channels for #WisdomWednesday. Typically these quotes are thematically related to The Long Dark, dealing with humanity's role in the natural world, and its journey through life. While the list we've gathered is extensive we realize that there may be other thinkers, writers, and philosophers out there worth inclusion.

So hoping to get greater diversity in our list of Wisdom Wednesday quotes we're turning to you our community of players for suggestions.

Do you know of an appropriate quote? Share them below and we'll be sure to give you credit for finding it if we share it.

Quote

Quote: <an insightful quote goes here>
Author: <the one who said or wrote it>
Submitted By: <the name or handle you'd like us to share to let the world know you contributed it>
Relevant Link: <link to Wikipedia, or other source with details about the quote or the author>

So just share the above details and we'll use the best ones in a future Wisdom Wednesday. 

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Quote: When the rich die last like the rabbits running from a lucky past full of shadow cunning, and the world lights up for the final day we will all be poor having had our say

Author: Young Marble Giants
Submitted By: Valuable Hunting Knife
Relevant Link: https://www.lyrics.com/lyric/4645535/Young+Marble+Giants/Final+Day

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Quote: "Many human beings say that they enjoy the winter, but what they really enjoy is feeling proof against it."
Author: Richard Adams, Watership Down
Submitted By: Nereol
Relevant Link: https://books-library.online/files/books-library.online-12270157Yh9E8.pdf

 

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Quote: "If we had no winter, the spring would not be so pleasant: if we did not sometimes taste of adversity, prosperity would not be so welcome"

Author: Anne Bradstreet

Submitted By: Chris Massey

Relevant Link: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/anne-bradstreet

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Quote:

Look again at that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it, everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every "superstar," every "supreme leader," every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there--on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known.

— Carl Sagan

Author: Carl Sagan
Submitted by: Jessica Egerton
Source: 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pale_Blue_Dot

Use some of it, all of it. any of it... it is the most profound, humbling quote out there.
Edited by Jess.Egerton
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"As long as I live, I'll hear waterfalls and birds and winds sing. I'll interpret the rocks, learn the language of flood, storm, and the avalanche. I'll acquaint myself with the glaciers and wild gardens, and get as near the heart of the world as I can"

~John Muir

-S Fairweather (contributor)

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Muir

 

 

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Quote: "Thus at every step we are reminded that we by no means rule over nature like a conqueror over a foreign people, like someone standing outside nature - but that we, with flesh, blood and brain, belong to nature, and exist in its midst, and that all our mastery of it consists in the fact that we have the advantage over all other creatures of being able to learn its laws and apply them correctly."

Author: Friedrich Engels, "Dialectics of Nature"

Submitted by: Victor W

Citation: https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1883/don/ch09.htm

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Please forgive both a second entry from myself, and two quotes from the same source:

Quotes:

'They talk of the heroism of the dying- they little know- it would be so easy to die, a dose of morphia, a friendly crevasse, and blissful sleep.  The trouble is to go on'.  

'I wanted those years over again.  What fun I would have had with them: what glorious fun!... and I wanted peaches and syrup- badly.'

Author: Apsley Cherry-Garrard (quotes taken from 'Cherry' by Sara Wheeler)

Citation: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1265536.Cherry  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Worst_Journey_in_the_World

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“Don't ask for guarantees. And don't look to be saved in any one thing, person, machine, or library. Do your own bit of saving, and if you drown, at least die knowing you were heading for shore.”
― Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

"The money was a mystery.  It took us a whole year to make what is now pocket change, but.. we didn't care.  We had the passion."
--Former Formula 1 Grand Prix driver -  Dan Gurney

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Quote: "When the last tree is cut, the last fish is caught, and the last river is polluted; when to breathe the air is sickening, you will realize, too late, that wealth is not in bank accounts and that you can’t eat money."

Author: Native American Alanis Obomsawin
Submitted By:  Moilanen
Relevant Link: https://quoteinvestigator.com/2011/10/20/last-tree-cut/
https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Alanis_Obomsawin

Edited by Moilanen
Added another link for the quote
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Quote: A challenge in which a succesful outcome is assured isn't a challenge at all
Author: Jon Krakauer
Relevant Link: Into the Wild (book)

Quote: Nature is not cruel, only pitilessly indifferent. This is one of the hardest lessons for humans to learn. We cannot admit that things might be neither good nor evil, neither cruel nor kind, but simply callous-indifferent to all suffering, lacking all purpose.
Author. Richard Dawkins, evolutionary biologist

Quote: The inner master when confronted with an obstacle, uses it as a fuel, like a fire which consumes things that are thrown into it. A small lamp would be snuffed out , but a big fire will engulf what is thrown at it and burn hotter, it consumes the obstacle and uses it to reach a higher level. 
Author: Marcus Aurelius
Relevant Link: Meditations (book)

above submitted by: manolitode

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“You just never know. You go along figuring some things don't change, ever, like being able to drive on a public highway without someone trying to murder you. And then one stupid thing happens. Twenty, twenty-five minutes out of your whole life, and all the ropes that kept you hanging in there get cut loose, and it's like 'There you are, right back in the jungle again.'
 

- Duel, 1971

***

"Keep your mind in hell, but despair not."

• - Saint Silouan [1866-1938]

***

"How quickly a man takes on the qualities of darkness. Men who live by night; the soldier,
    the thief, the traveller by night, the vagabond... theirs is a different way of
    thinking, and they do not fear the dark nor what may come upon them by night because
    they themselves are of the night, a part of it."


- Louis Lamour

***

"Barbarism is the natural state of mankind. Civilization is unnatural. It is a whim of circumstance.
    And barbarism must always ultimately triumph. "


— Howard, Robert E. Beyond the Black River, 1935

***

"The rifle is a weapon. Let there be no doubt about that.
    It is a tool of power, and thus dependent completely upon the moral stature of
    its user. It is equally useful in securing meat for the table, destroying group
    enemies on the battlefield, and resisting tyranny. In fact, it is the only means
    of resisting tyranny, since a citizenry armed with rifles simply cannot be tyrannized."


—Jeff Cooper, The Art of the Rifle

***

"Labor is the only prayer that Nature answers."

- Robert G. Ingersoll (from his address to the jury during the trial of C. B.
    Reynolds on a charge of Blasphemy)

***

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Quote: You are anxious because your path leads away from mother and home. But every step and every day lead you back again to the mother. Home is neither here nor there. Home is within you, or home is nowhere at all.
Author: Herman Hesse
Submitted By: Yollarbenibekler
Relevant Link: https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/27688-for-me-trees-have-always-been-the-most-penetrating-preachers , also from the book "Bäume"

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"The animal we call 'MEDVED' (bear) wasn't always called that - we know it had a different name, but that name has been forever lost. Our ancestors were so scared of bears that they wouldn't dare utter that name. Instead, they started calling it 'MED VYJED' (Honey eater), which later morphed into the current word. Such is the power of fear in humans."

(Czech linguistic discovery)

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