KateH

Visiting Canada!

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I'm going to Canada! This is awesome, as I live in the UK where everything is horrible.

However, until a few years ago I thought of Canada as a place of maple syrup and horseback cops in red coats. Since then I have played a video game which has informed me that Canada is in fact a perpetually frozen, wind blasted snowscape in which survival is only possible by stoning rabbits and snarling packs of hungry wolves are your constant and only companion.

British Columbia in November?

I don't have an expedition parka, nor any insulated boots. I am very afraid.

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I'm sure you know there are much better sources for tourism info than a video game.  The average mean temperature in Vancouver during November is +6C.  While colder than, say, London, that's still well above freezing.  If you get precipitation, it will most likely be rain (unless you go to places at higher elevations).  You likely won't need an expedition parka... just bring along a good winter coat that is waterproof unless you're planning to do some serious outdoors camping and climbing.  The mean low temperature in Whistler , BC (home of the ski resort which hosted the Alpine events during the 2010 Olympics) in November is around -2C.

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Its not like that dude. Iv never been to Canada, but can already tell you that while they may be well known for maple syrup, they are just like all of us all over the world. They like tasty food, a good time, and while the weather might be just a bit colder from time to time, still have seasons of heat, wet, cold, and dry. 👍

Its just a little different, Canadian style! 

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As a canadian myself, I can tell you that the one skill you MUST master before coming here is riding polar bears. You will require this to get to your ice fishing hut.

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Make sure you grab a few Ribena.  I hear that in the U.K. they changed the recipe. 

e322e6af241c8d779af6185fe225cecc_ra,w403,h403_pa,w403,h403.jpeg

Still sweet nectar in my part of Canada.

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2 hours ago, odizzido said:

As a canadian myself, I can tell you that the one skill you MUST master before coming here is riding polar bears. You will require this to get to your ice fishing hut.

Got it.

very-warmly-dressed-woman-low-res.jpg

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4 hours ago, odizzido said:

As a canadian myself, I can tell you that the one skill you MUST master before coming here is riding polar bears. You will require this to get to your ice fishing hut.

A part of my mind just exploded. XD

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Posted (edited)

Beautiful British Columbia, where even the bears loot the plastic containers!

This shot was taken Northern Vancouver Island,  Cape Scott, an active logging area. Someone left the crate behind and bears gonna do what bears do. 

This is a Black Bear, common to Vancouver Island. Black Bears are generally shy and not to be confused with the Brown/Grizzly/Kodiak variety. Brown Bears are much more aggressive - I would not take a photo of a Brown Bear at this distance, instead backing off very slowly.

Enjoy your visit, layer up, and a good waterproof outer layer is recommended for November :)

20180918_135050.thumb.jpg.bf488298ad12eab54f355fc0bb1514e0.jpg

Edited by killDCat
  • Upvote 1

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On 1/4/2020 at 3:18 PM, Ice Hole said:

Make sure you grab a few Ribena.  I hear that in the U.K. they changed the recipe. 

e322e6af241c8d779af6185fe225cecc_ra,w403,h403_pa,w403,h403.jpeg

Still sweet nectar in my part of Canada.

The only time I went to Canada, I noticed a prevalence of grape flavored things. Everything from drinks to donuts to candy bars with grape jelly inside of them. What gives? I was very confused.

Aside from that, absolutely beautiful country, very friendly people, and the weather's not too bad if you keep to the coast. Did a road trip from Seattle to Anchorage.

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Posted (edited)

Not sure about all the grape flavours.  Any chance this was wine country?

Ribena is made from the finest blackberry's lovingly picked at the optimal moment of ripeness.

BlackBerries.jpg

They do resemble a bunch of grapes, as if picked by giants.

Edited by Ice Hole
  • Upvote 1

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Oh Yes,  you must beware. I just finished repairing my hunting rifle. Still experiencing a few blizzards here at the homestead this time of year and I caught a glimpse of the old bear sneaking around the back porch. I might try digging out the car next week. I hope it still starts....

 

Kidding lol

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On 1/7/2020 at 7:31 PM, Ice Hole said:

Ribena is made from the finest blackberry's lovingly picked at the optimal moment of ripeness.

On the picture of bottle Ribena above it says Ribena is made from Blackcurrant, not blackberries.

 

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, peteloud said:

On the picture of bottle Ribena above it says Ribena is made from Blackcurrant, not blackberries.

You are right.  There is another drink mix that uses blackberry and I got them mixed up.  Both are still really tasty mixed with a little 99% strong home made natural sanitizer.

 

The blackberry looks like a "little bunch of grapes" and the black current is a string of berries. 

Benlomondsq.JPG

The black current is used best in traditional Canadian style butter tarts.

winter+recipes+044.JPG

The butter tart can be bastardized and contain raisins.  The oldest recipe known to Canada has black currents.  Unlike raisin being sweet the black currant is tart and contains little seed that offers a proper crunch.

 

Black currents were once at war with the united states or maybe it was the other way around.  The black current became contraband within the united states.

Wikipedia

Blackcurrants were once popular in the United States as well, but became less common in the 20th century after currant farming was banned in the early 1900s, when blackcurrants, as a vector of white pine blister rust, were considered a threat to the U.S. logging industry.

Edited by Ice Hole

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Sixty five years ago, when I was a kid, my family, patents, sister, aunts, uncles and cousins would go out blackberry picking in autumn.  It was great afternoon and well remembered.

I now do the same with my 8 & 10 years old granddaughters.  Then we make Blackberry and Apple Pies, and fill the freezer with blackberries.

I think it sad that nowadays kids only ever have shop products.  My B&A pies are 3mm patry on the bottom, 25mm of fruit and 4mm of pastry on the top.  Shop fruit pies are 5mm pastry on the bottom, then 15mm of filling with is 10% fruit, then 8mm pastry on the top.

 

 

 

 

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Keep it on going is the best.  These days homemade baked goods are becoming popular.

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I’ve driven through Canada five times from top to bottom (and bottom to top) since I used to live in Alaska (where we consider Canadians to be tenderfoot Cheechakos).  It’s pretty and fairly rugged, and has a lot of animals and scenery.  I’ve seen Rocky Mountain sheep and bears and wolves and deer and even a few bunnies.  And I’ve camped out along the way every time.  It’s a much different place than the UK, which is super tamed and mild in comparison.  
should be an adventure!

have fun!

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I've been there once ( in March ) and I can attest to the cold. Toronto was below freezing but not too bad. When we went north though it was brutally cold on the road. It was so cold that condensation froze on the windows inside of the van. I'm glad we all had warm ski clothes so if we had broken down or something.

Id go there again for the food alone. Hearty cold weather food, and French fries with get this, brown gravy. I think if you add cheese curds it's poutine. And of course the breakfast food.

At the time I was puzzled by the little shacks out on the frozen lake. For that matter I had never seen a lake completely frozen over, no ice at all really except a thin crust. I remember being amazed that you could drive a truck out on it.

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1 hour ago, odizzido said:

How far north did you go?

Me? Not too far north. I think they call the area Niagra Escarpment. 300 or 400 kilometers North or so. For our friends in Europe; That is not all that far in North America.

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