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Moll

Penalty for too hot

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i think there should be penalty when you wear too much clothes and become extremely over heated. "Feels like" can exceed 50 °C (122 °F) in TLD with no punisment.

High temperatures should cause:

1. Discomfort (you cannot sleep).

2. Thirst and increased water consumption.

3. Make your inner layer wett by sweat.

4. It makes you stinky due sweating (scent attracting predators).

 

 

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This would need to be handled carefully to avoid turning TLD into a dressing room simulator where you're just constantly putting stuff on and taking it off to regulate your temperature.

If overheating were handled similarly to freezing this could work.  If the feels like is over say 30, the meter starts to fill up with red.  Two bars of overheating at 40, three bars at 50+.  If the meter fills with red entirely, you pick up a Heat Exhaustion risk and start to lose condition, exactly the same way Freezing is handled.  Heat Exhaustion would have all the same effects as Hypothermia, but the cure is the opposite.  Stay in a cooler environment until Heat Exhaustion passes.  This could even be exploited by the player, intentionally sitting by a fire until they are very nearly overheated, before heading out.  That way they'd have essentially two full Temperature sub-conditions to go through before they start to freeze.

This would be particularly problematic at a forge, where you could be buck naked and still be overheating, necessitating that the player take short breaks in between forging projects, if they don't want to get heat stroke.  I don't imagine Interloper players would appreciate that! (Edit: I suppose they could just intentionally get to freezing in order to reverse exploit the temperature...)

So yeah...this COULD be done, but it would have to be done very carefully so that it contributes something to the game and doesn't just become a pain in the ass for survivors to deal with.  That hypothetical situation of "intentionally overheat your character so you take twice as long to freeze" might just be worth having to manage clothing.  It's fun to think about at any rate.  But realistically, I don't see this being added to TLD.  It would make more sense to include in a future project, perhaps one that involves multiple seasons.  Imagine The Long Dark: Summer Edition where you can pick up heat exhaustion just from sprinting around outdoors under the hot sun, only to cure it by jumping in a lake!

Edited by ajb1978
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I wouldnt be so complicated, feel like temperature if its high just increase water consumption and makes you clothes wet and smelly.

Yes, probably near the forging stuff you need to take your clothes off. What is the problem?

Edited by Moll

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5 minutes ago, Moll said:

Yes, probably near the forging stuff you need to take your clothes off. What is the problem?

A: It's HIGHLY unrealistic.  Wearing clothing while forging is more about protecting yourself from the intense heat of the forge, as well as protecting your skin from hot flying sparks.  Blacksmiths of old wore leather aprons and thick leather gloves for exactly this reason.

B: The problem is if you overheat in front of a forge it just needlessly complicates the process.  What gameplay improvements are introduced by forcing the player to spend more time and/or resources while forging?

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A: True, but forging with parka, i would rather keep it safe away from fire.

B: Forging is difficult and punishable choice. You wanna to build some cool stuff, there is price for it. If taking off some cloth or need of more water is significant forcing into spending more time and resources, then disable some working mechanics in game, they also forcing players to spend more time and resources than needed.

 

 

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Remember though that changes of this caliber would be very far-reaching, affecting every Survivor, Story, and Challenge mode game.  This would affect everyone, from the most easygoing Pilgrim run to the most hardcore Deadman runs.  Regardless of whether you ever spend any time at a forge, sooner or later you're gonna end up in that +30 to +50C range, and have to adjust your gameplay style to work around it. I don't know that it adds enough to the game to warrant that caliber of disruption.  By itself an overheating system does have merit and makes sense to an extent, but it really does belong in a separate game IMO.

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1 hour ago, ajb1978 said:

This could even be exploited by the player, intentionally sitting by a fire until they are very nearly overheated, before heading out.  That way they'd have essentially two full Temperature sub-conditions to go through before they start to freeze.

and this timer could also be shorter in interloper, to make harder to exploit!

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I am sure that too hot mechanic can be tuned to improve TLD gameplay for everyone.

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43 minutes ago, Moll said:

I am sure that too hot mechanic can be tuned to improve TLD gameplay for everyone.

While I can respect your opinion... it's an opinion that is not shared by everyone. 

I feel there comes a point where there is only so much micromanaging that can be done before it stops being fun and starts just feeling like a slog...

I see what you're driving at, I really do.  However, I just don't think it would be very fun to have to be pealing off clothes every time we enter an interior location... then piling them back on to step outside.  For the sake of role-playing in a few runs, I've done it as a personal rule (even kept separate pairs of outside boots and inside shoes).  Let me tell you from my experience, it gets really old... really fast.  I didn't mind doing it as a role-play thing (because it was entirely my choice to it), but I really would not find it fun at all if it were a forced aspect of the game. 

:coffee::fire:
This is kind of in the same vein as the individual that wanted to micromanage every aspect of fire starting in hyper-realistic terms...  and I felt the same way about that: There is only so much micromanaging I want to have to do in a video game.  That's why I don't enjoy and won't play most of Sid Meier's games.  :D 

Edited by ManicManiac
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in interiors you dont usually to be overheated, so taking off is required only in certain cases.

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Technically insulation works both ways. It prevents the transfer of heat energy, that's how it works. So in reality you'd become much more hot working at a forge naked much more quicker than if you were wearing an expedition parka and snow pants.

That said, once you DID get hot in your parka your body has a reduced capacity to evaporate sweat and therefore it gets even hotter than naked. 

I think this might have more negative effects than good, what purpose does this feature have? Is it to prevent forge marathons? We could link it directly to the forging action then. 

I do like the idea of sweating through your inner layers. Clothing wetness only becomes an issue in specific cases and certain maps currently (Forlorn Muskeg). 

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I wouldn't like this at all I'm afraid.

I can appreciate people wanting more realism, but I think having to manage your clothing like this would be a step too far. 

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I like the idea of excessive sprinting causing your character to sweat and your inner layer gradually becoming wet.  This would lead to increased dehydration and a reduction in the temperature benefit from your inner clothing, an increased risk of hypothermia also.

Changing clothing whilst outdoors and away from a fire should have negative consequences. Increased hypothermia and frostbite risk perhaps.

Edited by Daymo

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