Mel Guille

Tips for new survivors

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Posted (edited)

Concerning perishable items: apart from food (the only eternal ones are water, crackers and cat tail stalks) you should store pills outside containers. When items degrade to 0% condition they disappear from containers if they can't be recycled (clothes for cloth or leather, torches for sticks, tools for metal and so on, not sure about canned food for cans). I suppose 0% pills don't work anymore (never tried), but pills make a wonderful path marker, especially in caves. Dropping a single pill will create a pill box (I know it doesn't make sense but it's ok for me) which is quite colorful and easy to spot. When the tunnel forks I put two pills (one for each "doorway") to mark the correct path. I use antibiotics even if they're still good, since they're almost useless, unless you're unlucky enought to get parasites before raising cooking skill to 5. Water purification tablets are even more useless and create larger boxes, but they're not as plentiful.

If you loathe using such vile exploits of graphics you can use tinder bundles or cat tails heads, which you can spin and arrange in place to create nice arrow signs. Stones work too, but you may be confused by the naturally spawning ones you find in caves. Pills are the best because of their negligible weight.

Edited by Doc Feral

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Doc Feral,

" Using a small piece (the 0.1 kgs or so harvesting leftover) of cooked meat is better. "

Thanks for that info.  I assumed that was the case but have never got around to checking it out.

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Posted (edited)

Practice throwing stones at everything.  Rabbits... Wolves... Bears... Deer... doesn't matter.  The more to pitch stones the more naturally your estimation of the throw will be.  We all know by now that a stalking wolf will charge as soon as you aim... well you don't have to aim to pitch a stone.  If you are practiced, you can always send them running any time they start to stalk you with a well placed throw.

Also, pitching stones to annoy bears is funny :D 

Edited by ManicManiac

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Deer parking: you of course know that you can startle a deer sending them in the direction you want. But note that when it stops running, it will tend to turn to face you and slowly wander back toward you. This means you can fine tune deer positioning for a head shot in a more convenient place. Such as your camp (office):

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Good

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Trip hazard

  • Upvote 1

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Something I learned recently: the stink bar indicator not showing up doesn't mean you don't stink.  Carrying any meat at all gives you a sizable aggro radius for wolves and a wide one for bears.  On voyager animals are still sparse enough to avoid, but on stalker there's just too many wolves who mosey your way as soon as you get within a half a kilometer of them, while bears home in basically as soon as you can see them.  But drop all the meat and you practically have to boop them on the nose before they'll notice you.

Which means that baiting with a sliver of meat is not a *defense,* you don't want to carry one around just in case. It can bribe off a stalking wolf, sure, but odds are the wolf wouldn't have noticed you if you didn't have it.  Instead it's an offensive maneuver to work around an explicit game mechanic. When a wolf or a bear is stalking you and you aim at it (with a rock, a gun, anything), it'll charge you while dodging sideways, making it hard to hit.  But if it's going for some meat you've dropped instead, it's no longer stalking you so as long as it stays outside the normal attack radius it won't mind you aiming at its head.

The same attack behavior is why people say you should practice throwing rocks without aiming - if you can hit a wolf it'll scare him off - and hunt by driving a deer into a wolf - the latter won't mind you lining up a headshot at a distance you'd be charged otherwise.

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Posted (edited)

A few things I've discovered playing over the past couple years...(started when there was only chapter 1 of storymode)

First, I will only ever carry 2 recycled cans at a time. When you start a campfire, there's only 2 cooking slots. It's completely illogical to carry anything more than you can use. Cooking pots are great to have in your base, but not on your person. Too much weight. And, if you're on the move, you need to pack light. Cooking pots don't facilitate that.

Moose are worth killing. Bears are not. If it's a dire emergency and you need to craft the bear skin bedroll, then it's iffy at best to attempt to kill a bear, but the meat is not worth risking trichinosis over. Moose is the same calories, but it's an herbivore so no risk eating, and the hide is far more valuable than a gun (in my opinion). The moose satchel is always #1 priority for me.

Don't set up your base somewhere that can't easily access 1)A 6 burner stove, 2) A forge, 3) A workbench, 4) Other areas to explore. I've lived, and died, hundreds of times. HUNDREDS. My most common deaths are from lacking the ability to cook large quantities of food and water at a time, having no ammo or arrows, not being able to make arrows or clothing or a bow, and not being able to find the gear I need to replace.

Starting single stick campfires is a great visual queue for where you can safely cross the ice. I spend quite a bit of time traveling around Forlorn Muskeg, and falling through the ice is not fun. To take the thinking out of it, I use a magnifying glass (if I have one) and start a single stick campfire when I safely cross the ice. This leaves behind a burned out campfire that marks a pathway for me. No second guessing, no more falling through the ice. The added touch of using the magnifying glass means I'm not burning through all my matches. This also got me the 1000 fires started badge pretty easily, so now every sandbox starts out with level 3 fire starting and I no longer need to carry around tinder.

Don't be afraid to drop your gear in a pile and come back for it later. I've often, and frequently, dropped my guns, tools, etc. to bring my weight down in order to get large quantities of whatever back to my base. Moose meat, firewood, whatever. I like to keep my main camp in Mountain Town, and I'm frequently climbing ropes going to and from Forlorn Muskeg or Mystery Lake. Sometimes, I need to carry 80 lbs of something up a rope, so carrying 50 lbs of tools and gear with it is an impossibility. Drop your gear, carry the load.

The bow and arrows are your best friends. If you're shooting off all your rifle and revolver ammo early on, you're not going to make it very far. I prefer using the bow and arrow to hunt in the first 200+ days. I've even killed a moose with a bow and arrow. Wasting your ammo early on in the game means when it comes time that you really need to fire your gun, you're already dead. Treat your ammo and guns like they're your children. Protect them. Save them.

 

Edited by Crakkerjakked
  • Upvote 1

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I usually carry 1 cooking pot and 1 tin can... why?  That way I can boil up a full day's supply of water while I get a hearty 2-hour nap by a warm fire without boiling the pot dry.

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20 hours ago, Crakkerjakked said:

A few things I've discovered...
...
...
...
...
...
...  like they're your children. Protect them. Save them.

 

Re: above post:
All protein, no filler.  Great post.

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I get apprehensive about boiling a pot dry. Normally it takes me 84 minutes to make two liters of water. I have tried making pots of water in succession while sleeping one hour at a time, but I could see the benefit from that short sleeps was rather limited. I have also been surprised (I don't know why) when a blizzard rolls in and the rate of cooking food/making water can increase up to double normal (42 minutes to make two liters of water).  I have left a pot on a stove with enough burn time to make boiled water and, since it was inside, not worried about it boiling away. 

 

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, UTC-10 said:

I get apprehensive about boiling a pot dry. Normally it takes me 84 minutes to make two liters of water. I have tried making pots of water in succession while sleeping one hour at a time, but I could see the benefit from that short sleeps was rather limited. I have also been surprised (I don't know why) when a blizzard rolls in and the rate of cooking food/making water can increase up to double normal (42 minutes to make two liters of water).  I have left a pot on a stove with enough burn time to make boiled water and, since it was inside, not worried about it boiling away. 

 

As your cooking level increases, cooking times decrease.  At Level 1, it takes very close to 2 hours to boil water and then it takes, I think, another 15  (correction 40) minutes or so to boil it dry.  In the back end of most caves, which is where I build my main fire, it would be considered indoors as well.  If I have a magnifying lens, I'll also usually have a fire just inside the mouth of the cave that I use the mag lens to start and then take a torch to start my main fire that's near the back.  Boiling pots dry hasn't been a problem for me by just waking up at two-hour intervals.  It also allows me to check how the weather is doing.  I can always cook smaller amounts of water in the larger pot (and it boils faster than in a tin), but if I'm only carrying tins, I don't have the option of boiling the larger amount of water if there's a time when I want a fire burning for 2 hours while I do something else - not just sleeping, reading, mending, chopping wood...  I don't like that the cooking pots are heavy... if they weren't, I'd definitely always carry 2 of them.  However, since they are heavy, I split the difference and carry 1cooking pot and 1 tin.

Edited by UpUpAway95

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Jumping back in to offer up another tip I left off absent mindedly...crafting arrows is a huge deal, in my opinion. It's one of my constants, as I described before. Using arrows, however, is not without its consequences. Each time you fire an arrow, the condition of the arrow will drop. Eventually, the arrow breaks. Fantastically logical outcome. When you harvest that broken arrow, you do get back the arrow head, but only 2 of the 3 feathers used to craft it. One can assume that collecting feathers is something that is pretty necessary to save on gun ammo.

Now, feathers are really common throughout the game, so my trick isn't at all a necessity. Every corpse, be it animal or dead human, will have feathers near by. From my observations, it will be anywhere between 2-4 of them within 2 yards of the corpse. My trick, that I wish to share with newbies, is to collect the feathers BEFORE you skin that dead deer or wolf. Once you're done harvesting, a new set of feathers will lie on the ground, effectively doubling your collection of them. To maximize potential...approach the dead animal, collect the feathers. Then harvest ONLY the hide, and collect the feathers when it's finished, then go back for 1 of the 2 guts, collect the feathers, then the final gut, and then collect the feathers again. This gives you 4 total collection sets of feathers from the same animal. Instead of 2-4, you get 8-16 feathers.

With this method (or madness. Whatever), you can amass a large quantity of feathers incredibly early in your adventure. Because they don't weigh much, and they don't lose condition, you can store hundreds of them right off the bat. Even if you can't quite use them yet, they're still ready when you can.

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