alone sniper

Sleeping bag and hammock ??

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there is already a sleeping bag? as for a hammock that might be good to get our butt off the frozen ground as well.

Edited by nicko

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Hammocks will be great in summer, and go along with the ever-wanted Sit feature. I'm waiting for them to take a note from Bethesda and let us relax in all the furniture. Nudge nudge, Hinterland! To bring up another old topic I think we should be able to lay down on, say, a dismantled cardboard box and sleep. More improvised places to lie down and get a little nap. I'd like the sleeping bag to look more plush and comfortable than it currently does, but that's more of an immersion nitpick. :flirt:

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Yup. I'd like more options when it comes to places where I can rest/pass time. (Once it occurred to me there's at least one game balance reason for Hinterland not allowing that, but I can't remember what it was, so I'm supporting this idea until I remember it.)

About the hammock, would there be a functional difference between it and, say, a bedroll? Don't hammocks naturally retain less heat (since your back is exposed to air)?

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Hammocks are awful for staying warm. They are also a great way to develop testicular torsion if you are a male. There is basically nothing you could do for testicular torsion by yourself in a wilderness survival situation, so enjoy your crippling pain and resulting necrosis/gangrene.

Pass on hammocks. My summer camp literally banned hammocks for overnight sleeping after we had several cases of severe hypothermia and 2 cases of testicular torsion develop one summer.

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13 hours ago, Boston123 said:

Hammocks are awful for staying warm. They are also a great way to develop testicular torsion if you are a male. There is basically nothing you could do for testicular torsion by yourself in a wilderness survival situation, so enjoy your crippling pain and resulting necrosis/gangrene.

Pass on hammocks. My summer camp literally banned hammocks for overnight sleeping after we had several cases of severe hypothermia and 2 cases of testicular torsion develop one summer.

Could you somehow cite the health risks associated with sleeping in a hammock? Im having an awful hard time corroborating your story. In fact, the health benefits seem numerous. 

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Same here. I would love to try hammock sleeping, as I'm one of those people who have to have quite a few pillows under my head when sleeping on a regular bed. 

I have to point out that one of the oldest and best ways to keep an infant close and content is by basically creating a hammock for them that wraps around the parent's body.

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1 hour ago, ElvisHunter said:

Could you somehow cite the health risks associated with sleeping in a hammock? Im having an awful hard time corroborating your story. In fact, the health benefits seem numerous. 

What "health benefits"? There are no health benefits to sleeping on a hammock.

Hammocks lack insulation as a matter of course, plus they will always have free-moving air beneath them, meaning that you will lose heat very rapidly. This means that it is very likely that you will develop hypothermia when sleeping in a hammock. Yes, even in the summer.

I had a friend that worked with me at said Scout summer camp. He slept in a hammock, wrapped up in a blanket (so he wasn't exposed to the air), and I slept on the ground. In the morning, he developed hypothermia, while I was nice and warm. It was around 50 degrees F in the morning as well, so it wasn't even cold.

Another example: It was early Autumn, and my Troop was camping out. The first night, I slept in a hammock, wrapped up in blankets, with an additional blanket beneath me. I was cold and uncomfortable all night, waking up numerous times to rearrange the blankets. The second night, I said "screw this", and slept on a slab of plywood. I was almost infinitely warmer sleeping on a slab of plywood (which was located away from the fire), than I was in a hammock (which was right next to the fire).

In almost all cases, you are "better off" sleeping on the ground than you are in a hammock. Just pile up some leaves or some broken-down cardboard boxes for insulation.  Just my wilderness-survival-trained opinion. Hammocks, in almost all cases, are overrated. 

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2 hours ago, Boston123 said:

What "health benefits"? There are no health benefits to sleeping on a hammock.

Hammocks lack insulation as a matter of course, plus they will always have free-moving air beneath them, meaning that you will lose heat very rapidly. This means that it is very likely that you will develop hypothermia when sleeping in a hammock. Yes, even in the summer.

I had a friend that worked with me at said Scout summer camp. He slept in a hammock, wrapped up in a blanket (so he wasn't exposed to the air), and I slept on the ground. In the morning, he developed hypothermia, while I was nice and warm. It was around 50 degrees F in the morning as well, so it wasn't even cold.

Another example: It was early Autumn, and my Troop was camping out. The first night, I slept in a hammock, wrapped up in blankets, with an additional blanket beneath me. I was cold and uncomfortable all night, waking up numerous times to rearrange the blankets. The second night, I said "screw this", and slept on a slab of plywood. I was almost infinitely warmer sleeping on a slab of plywood (which was located away from the fire), than I was in a hammock (which was right next to the fire).

In almost all cases, you are "better off" sleeping on the ground than you are in a hammock. Just pile up some leaves or some broken-down cardboard boxes for insulation.  Just my wilderness-survival-trained opinion. Hammocks, in almost all cases, are overrated. 

nonsense. Please quote someone other than your uncle. 

http://www.criticalcactus.com/hammock-sleeping-benefits/

http://www.treklightgear.com/treklife/sleeping-in-a-hammock-is-good-for-you/

http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/news/20110621/hammocks-help-you-sleep 

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46 minutes ago, ElvisHunter said:

One of your sources refers to the correlation between sleeping positions and personality types 9_9

Another has a sample size of 12. That is useless.

I think I can safely ignore any conclusions those sites come to regarding sleeping.

Besides, all of my posts refer to my own experiences and opinions with hammocks.

Considering how the website I linked to explains how testicular torsion happens, I am not going to repeat it here.

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16 minutes ago, Boston123 said:

Considering how the website I linked to explains how testicular torsion happens, I am not going to repeat it here.

Sorry. I do not follow all your threads so I possibly missed your link. Which site are you talking about? 

As for the webMD link you're welcome to your own opinions. A scientific journal saw fit to print the article they referenced, your statistical analysis notwithstanding.

http://www.qcc.cuny.edu/SocialSciences/ppecorino/PHIL_of_RELIGION_TEXT/CHAPTER_5_ARGUMENTS_EXPERIENCE/Burden-of-Proof.htm

Edited by ElvisHunter
obvious logical fallacies

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On 14.8.2016 at 7:29 AM, Boston123 said:

Hammocks are awful for staying warm. They are also a great way to develop testicular torsion if you are a male. There is basically nothing you could do for testicular torsion by yourself in a wilderness survival situation, so enjoy your crippling pain and resulting necrosis/gangrene.

 

Don't give the future modders any weird ideas :D

But yeah, I don't see a place for a hammock in the game - if you can carry a hammock you can also carry a bedroll. 

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On 8/15/2016 at 11:21 PM, Wastelander said:

Don't give the future modders any weird ideas

:D:D:D 
Can testicular torsion kill ??

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On 8/15/2016 at 8:58 PM, ElvisHunter said:

Sorry. I do not follow all your threads so I possibly missed your link. Which site are you talking about? 

As for the webMD link you're welcome to your own opinions. A scientific journal saw fit to print the article they referenced, your statistical analysis notwithstanding.

By itself? No.

The "side effects" of it, however, can be, and in a survival situation, probably will be. 

First things first: Pain. Apparently, testicular torsion hurts so bad, you can't even walk. One of the kids that developed it at my summer camp had to be literally carried to a vehicle. He couldn't even hobble. Now, picture that in snow, or on ice. Bad times

Secondly: If the testicle doesn't have blood flow returned to it within a day or so, you are pretty much going to lose the testicle. NOTE: returning blood flow is highly unlikely without surgery. By "losing the testicle", I mean necrosis will set in due to lack of oxygen. You will then have to .... -ahem- remove the dead flesh in some fashion. 
 

Thirdly: gangrene. If you can't muster up the courage to cut off one of your own testicles, then gangrene will pretty much set in. This will be like the gangrene from any other necroticised flesh. Or, probably more likely, you will just get a blood infection and die.

FINAL NOTE: Testicular torsion is almost overwhelmingly more likely to happen to males under 25 years of age. However, that doesn't make hammocks any better to sleep in long-term.

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2 minutes ago, Boston123 said:

By itself? No.

The "side effects" of it, however, can be, and in a survival situation, probably will be. 

First things first: Pain. Apparently, testicular torsion hurts so bad, you can't even walk. One of the kids that developed it at my summer camp had to be literally carried to a vehicle. He couldn't even hobble. Now, picture that in snow, or on ice. Bad times

Secondly: If the testicle doesn't have blood flow returned to it within a day or so, you are pretty much going to lose the testicle. NOTE: returning blood flow is highly unlikely without surgery. By "losing the testicle", I mean necrosis will set in due to lack of oxygen. You will then have to .... -ahem- remove the dead flesh in some fashion. 
 

Thirdly: gangrene. If you can't muster up the courage to cut off one of your own testicles, then gangrene will pretty much set in. This will be like the gangrene from any other necroticised flesh. Or, probably more likely, you will just get a blood infection and die.

FINAL NOTE: Testicular torsion is almost overwhelmingly more likely to happen to males under 25 years of age. However, that doesn't make hammocks any better to sleep in long-term.

And 
Do all of the hammock sleeper get this? 

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6 minutes ago, alone sniper said:

And 
Do all of the hammock sleeper get this? 

No. Again, testicular torsion is most likely to happen to males under 25 years of age. 

Sleeping in a hammock just makes it more likely. There is less support, and more "room" to move around in ways that things are not meant to move around.

Tellingly,  both cases of testicular torsion happened to kids that were sleeping in hammocks, overnight and for multiple nights. Not just taking naps, but full-on 8 hours.  The kids that slept in regular bunks never had any problems. 

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2 hours ago, Boston123 said:

No. Again, testicular torsion is most likely to happen to males under 25 years of age.

GO TEAM VENTURE!

 

 

 

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The difference between bedroll and sleeping bag is superficial in my idea. But what about tents ?

And of course I talk again about sleeping on the floor, that should exist

Edited by Vinceofpyrenees

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56 minutes ago, Vinceofpyrenees said:

I talk again about sleeping on the floor, that should exist

agree . 
But it should have some bad effect (for example back pain and ...)

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On 8/19/2016 at 10:29 AM, Boston123 said:

No. Again, testicular torsion is most likely to happen to males under 25 years of age. 

Sleeping in a hammock just makes it more likely. There is less support, and more "room" to move around in ways that things are not meant to move around.

Tellingly,  both cases of testicular torsion happened to kids that were sleeping in hammocks, overnight and for multiple nights. Not just taking naps, but full-on 8 hours.  The kids that slept in regular bunks never had any problems. 

Dr. Steven Park, a member of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, is quoted as saying that the ideal sleeping posture is “lying on one’s back, with the head slightly elevated, about 10 – 30 percent.”

...hammocks put you in this exact position: on your back, with your head slightly elevated.

Unlike a bed, which allows for all sorts of unhealthful sleeping positions, a hammock forces you into an optimal sleeping position.

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