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Hi guys!!! :)

Those empty cave in Timberwolf mountain need to be threat !!!!!! 

Edited by alone sniper
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Threat? Well I wouldn't say that, but bats would be nice as an ambiance or just to let them fly around if you get near. Not much point in making them artificially "vampire bats". :D

Are bats actually dangerous or heck native in Canada? O.o

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yeh maybe nice to see a few bats flying around? or I rather just see some cave roof falling from time to time, this might produce/respawn those coal blocks?

Edited by nicko
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From Wikipedia: "Bats may also transmit rabies to humans. Although rare, a bat bite or scratch, particularly from silver-haired bats, may result in rabies to humans, cats, or dogs. Rabid bats usually lose their ability to fly, and rarely become aggressive. Careless handling of bats is the main cause of rabies transmission, which has resulted in five human cases in Canada since 1925."

So yeah, apparently there are bats in Canada, but they would probably serve only as a visual prop. (Unless our survivor is desperate enough to try bat stew.)

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nice wiki and? antibiotics? but yeh would be a nice feature in the warmer caves.

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2 hours ago, Hiemalis said:

 

From Wikipedia: "Bats may also transmit rabies to humans. Although rare, a bat bite or scratch, particularly from silver-haired bats, may result in rabies to humans, cats, or dogs. Rabid bats usually lose their ability to fly, and rarely become aggressive. Careless handling of bats is the main cause of rabies transmission, which has resulted in five human cases in Canada since 1925."

 

rabies is a very big deal for TLD !!! 

I prefer some sort of infection that treat by 2 antibiotics.

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It's a very serious disease, sure, but five human cases in almost a century (transmited by Canadian bats) makes it too rare to be a real threat. As it says, "rabid bats usually lose their ability to fly and rarely becomes aggressive", so our survivor would have to deliberately catch the bat and force the poor little thing to spit on her face in order to get rabies. Otherwise, it's a simple matter of avoiding them, i.e., not touching them.

But don't get me wrong: I'm all for bats in the mines and caves.

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2 minutes ago, Hiemalis said:

It's a very serious disease, sure, but five human cases in almost a century (transmited by Canadian bats) makes it too rare to be a real threat. As it says, "rabid bats usually lose their ability to fly and rarely becomes aggressive", so our survivor would have to deliberately catch the bat and force the poor little thing to spit on her face in order to get rabies. Otherwise, it's a simple matter of avoiding them, i.e., not touching them.

But don't get me wrong: I'm all for bats in the mines and caves.

rabies is not only ill that survivor can get from bat.
 

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2 minutes ago, alone sniper said:

rabies is not only ill that survivor can get from bat.
 

In North America?

Half the the serious illnesses associated with bats are native to African, or South American tropical bats. Here in West Virginia bats are considered a beneficial animal, and we build them houses the way some people have bird houses. They are not really dangerous, they are for the most part very small insectivores, that hibernate through the winter. 

A lot of them don't even live in caves, but if you found a roost in the winter they'd likely not even move, and disturbing them would probably kill them.

Instead of the CDC's worldwide bat scariness, try this site for more localized info on North American bats:

http://extension.psu.edu/natural-resources/wildlife/wildlife-nuisance-and-damage/bats/wildlife-damage-control-4-bats 

Although it mostly focuses on what to do if you have bats in your house, you'll notice that they don't mention any of the horrible diseases on the CDC page, because the little brown bats here in the US and Canada don't carry them.

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2 minutes ago, miah999 said:

In North America?

Half the the serious illnesses associated with bats are native to African, or South American tropical bats. Here in West Virginia bats are considered a beneficial animal, and we build them houses the way some people have bird houses. They are not really dangerous, they are for the most part very small insectivores, that hibernate through the winter. 

A lot of them don't even live in caves, but if you found a roost in the winter they'd likely not even move, and disturbing them would probably kill them.

Instead of the CDC's worldwide bat scariness, try this site for more localized info on North American bats:

http://extension.psu.edu/natural-resources/wildlife/wildlife-nuisance-and-damage/bats/wildlife-damage-control-4-bats 

Although it mostly focuses on what to do if you have bats in your house, you'll notice that they don't mention any of the horrible diseases on the CDC page, because the little brown bats here in the US and Canada don't carry them.

Well. Thanks for links! :)

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If im not mistaken then bats go deep in the caves, where its warm, in the winter and hibernate there.

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Most of the illnesses you'd get from a bat cave would be from the toxic guano not the bats themselves. As many have already pointed out rabies is not that common in North America and our bats don't attack people.

They do look really cool flying around in the summer though :winky:

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The bats are active in the winter yes? I have seen them in Vail but I don't know about canadia. Obviously they would not be a threat, but a jumpscare for the noobies would be nice. 

Edited by sir ice
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Cave-dwelling bats produce high nitrate guano that can be used to manufacture gunpowder. If reloading munitions becomes a thing, this could be useful in making ammunition renewable.

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8 minutes ago, EternityTide said:

Cave-dwelling bats produce high nitrate guano that can be used to manufacture gunpowder. If reloading munitions becomes a thing, this could be useful in making ammunition renewable.

+1

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what? grab some bat poo and you make gun powder? hrm Ok batman. Though some bats flyijg around in a caves might be a fun factor

Edited by nicko
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7 hours ago, sir ice said:

The bats are active in the winter yes? I have seen them in Vail but I don't know about canadia. Obviously they would not be a threat, but a jumpscare for the noobies would be nice. 

That doesn't sound right, North American bats eat insects, unless it is quite warm, there are no insects for them to eat in the winter. That's why they hibernate. And why if you disturb them they die in the winter, they starve to death in a matter of days if not hours.

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4 hours ago, miah999 said:

That doesn't sound right, North American bats eat insects, unless it is quite warm, there are no insects for them to eat in the winter. That's why they hibernate. And why if you disturb them they die in the winter, they starve to death in a matter of days if not hours.

Yep. They have to hibernate in winter or they freeze to death. Bat hibernation is becoming a major problem as there is now a fungus that is slowly wiping out hibernating bat colonies in Canada and the US.

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1 hour ago, cekivi said:

Yep. They have to hibernate in winter or they freeze to death. Bat hibernation is becoming a major problem as there is now a fungus that is slowly wiping out hibernating bat colonies in Canada and the US.

Very true we do a lot here to try and protect the local bat population, as they're our major mosquito predator.

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10 hours ago, miah999 said:

That doesn't sound right, North American bats eat insects, unless it is quite warm, there are no insects for them to eat in the winter. That's why they hibernate. And why if you disturb them they die in the winter, they starve to death in a matter of days if not hours.

Lol now I feel like an idiot but your right.

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On 13.8.2016 at 3:20 PM, nicko said:

what? grab some bat poo and you make gun powder? hrm Ok batman. Though some bats flyijg around in a caves might be a fun factor

Believe it or not, but there was at least one war about the stuff: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chincha_Islands_War

Goes to show humans will kill each other over quite literally any crap imaginable.

As for the bats, most things have already been said. One thing I'd like to add: When seasons are added, and if bats are then added, then I'd only like them as a visual prop. They're pretty hard to spot, move pretty unpredictably and, quite frankly, starving is probably healthier than eating Canada Fried Bat (eleven germs and viruses!)

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13 minutes ago, Wastelander said:

Believe it or not, but there was at least one war about the stuff: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chincha_Islands_War

Goes to show humans will kill each other over quite literally any crap imaginable.

Actually the seabird guano they were fighting over was more useful for fertilizer, while potassium nitrate COULD be extracted from it, cave dwellling bat guano is a superior source, requiring far less processing. Of course, it was an excellent soil improver, which gave it high value.

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