Morale Need and Resulting Gameplay Expansion


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I’ve been playing for a while now, and I see that there are a lot of missed opportunities in gameplay because of the lack of a morale/comfort need in the game.  Not only will it add realism, but cure that late game boredom from redundancy.  Looking forward to the future or not feeling like there is one, and having a little fun from time to time is an important reality of survival.  It also encompasses much of the most commonly requested things on the forum.

 

This new need will have to be either slow decaying or easily satisfied to avoid it overtaking gameplay and players repeating the same action many times in a row to fill the need. If the need is not satisfied, it will make the character tired, hungry, and get older easier.  It won’t kill you, but it will become irritating and the player will want to satisfy the need soon.

 

 Decision making is a core game component and deciding to use items in new interactions deepens the concept.

 

1.      Candles and Honey.

 

a.       Bees can be added to game and provide a vast variety of new interactions.

 

                                                              i.      Harvesting honeycomb will sacrifice health from being stung.

 

                                                            ii.      Can be used as bait for wildlife.

 

                                                          iii.      Honey can be eaten.

 

                                                          iv.      Wax can be melted and cloth can be added to create candles.

 

                                                            v.      Wax can be melted and herbs (rosehips and other new harvestable) can be added to make balm to treat afflictions.

 

1.      This should need a container to be put in – maybe an old body cream tin or a craftable container.

 

2.      Moisturizers

 

a.       Some people may think it odd, but winter is dry and makes you uncomfortable at times and cause afflictions.

 

                                                              i.      Finding lotion bottles or body cream tins in medical cabinets and first aid kits can be used to treat dry skin and bee stings as well as raise morale.

 

                                                            ii.      Lip balm in gas stations and medical cabinets can treat chapped lips and provide morale boost.

 

                                                          iii.      Balm crafting from above can be used to treat both afflictions listed.

 

3.       Whittling and Weaving.

 

a.       Sticks, saplings, and firewood can be used to whittle.  Cordage can be made with saplings (cut first, then cured in strips), reeds that grow need water, and vining plants. Perhaps a chair is required to sit in while creating an item.

 

                                                              i.      Weaving process will boost morale.

 

1.      Weave gathering baskets to collect berries –blueberries, cranberries, and elderberries (these are poisonous if eaten before dark and ripe – good for gameplay) are all native to Canada (imagine them smooshed all over your gear and backpack if you put them inside)

 

a.       Berries can be eaten fresh or dried (like curing pelts) in their baskets.

 

b.      You will need to drop the basket in order to use other gear like a gun or bow and cannot be added to your pack; however, the weight of the contents will still be included.

 

2.      Create log holders for beside the fireplace and stove.

 

                                                            ii.      Whittling can only be done with a knife and the process will boost morale.

 

1.      Carve a walking/hiking stick to improve speed going uphill and decrease the likelihood of injury going downhill.

 

2.      Whittle figurines of wildlife and use them as bookends on a shelf, a viewing interaction will provide a small amount of morale boost.

 

3.      Carve matchboxes that hold up to 50 matches and declutter inventories.

 

4.      Make a candleholder so a candle can be used as a lantern (but running will put the candle out).

 

5.      Carve a birdfeeder to attract birds that (rarely) drop feathers and lay eggs in the trees nearby.

 

a.       Eggs will easily break while being harvested and require a gathering basket.

 

b.      Feeders will need filled every few days (or weeks) with seeds and nuts.

 

                                                                                                                                      i.      Squirrels/raccoons can destroy feeders and take the food from inside or even become trapped or killed inside one that has fallen and be used to harvest meat, guts, and pelts.

 

1.      Hats can be made from cured pelts.

 

 

 

4.      Music.

 

a.       Stationary (not moveable) instruments (with sheet music) can be found in various locations are the world and a few (rare) moveable ones as well. Perhaps sheet music can be found hidden all over the world.

 

                                                              i.      Piano in the church.

 

                                                            ii.      Harmonica in the trapper’s.

 

                                                          iii.      Guitar in a cabin.

 

                                                          iv.      Cello in a school music room.

 

5.      Alcohol.

 

a.       Drinking will make you a little sleepy, but allow you to become warmer slightly faster.  It will be hard to find alcohol and you’ll want to ration it.

 

                                                              i.      Communion wine in the church.

 

                                                            ii.      Vodka in a cargo hold.

 

more stuff from my notes that I didn't mention

                                                              i.      Beer in the gas station.

                                                            ii.      Whisky in the trapper’s.

                                                          iii.      Moonshine in the barn.

2.      Smoking.

a.       Cigarettes are ultra-rare (everyone who smokes would be smoking like crazy during this terrible point in history) and will mostly be found singly or in pairs on corpses and in the gas station; perhaps a few in a motel lobby?

                                                              i.      With this comes the potential for a lighter.  I have mixed feelings about it, but if they are very rare and decay easily it wouldn’t take too much away from gameplay, but actually add a little.  They could be used as an accelerant in a pinch. Perhaps an ultra-rare zippo could be the only lighter available and use kerosene. BTW I wish we could empty lantern fuel into jerry cans and other jerry cans into each other, it is annoying.

3.      Roasting/Making Jerky.

a.       Smoking meats to make jerky makes a lot of sense in this environment, I mean beef jerky is a staple in early gameplay.

                                                              i.      Perhaps a new piece of equipment is needed (found or built) to make jerky.

b.      Nuts can be roasted and eaten–hazelnuts and black walnuts are native to Canada.

                                                              i.      Trail mix can be made with roasted nuts and dried berries; perhaps mix in candy you find.

1.      The process of making the trail mix and eating it after you finished will boost morale, but not change the nutrition of the food.

2.      Mixing will require a container to keep it in – maybe a zip-lock bag or craftable pouch.

4.      Growing Plants.

a.       A stationary greenhouse (in a school biology lab on its roof, a burnt down homestead, or a supermarket) should be available. Growing plants should be difficult to reduce the risk of exploitation or making the game too easy and ruin the atmosphere at turn it into a farming simulation. Each step in the process will boost morale as it is being completed.  There will be no beds stoves nearby to avoid base camp potential and exploitation.

                                                              i.      Barely, corn, beans, onions, and herbs can be grown but will need lots of care.  They will cause a stomach ache if eaten raw and will need to be cooked into stew.

1.      Heat.  A heating furnace (that cannot be used to cook or boil water) will need to burn nearly continuously for hours each day for many days to allow plants to grow.

2.      Water. Lots of water will be needed to quench plants properly. Perhaps you need a watering can or spray bottle to complete the action.

3.      Fertilizer.  Fish can be added to a bin (in greenhouse) and left for several weeks to until I can be used.

5.      Small Animal Interactions.

a.       Birdfeeders are mentioned above, perhaps craftable birdhouses as well for a slightly more likely egg nest?

b.      Breeding rabbits.  This process will require a lot of effort to avoid exploitation and making the game too easy.

                                                              i.      Time.

1.      WEEKS, at least two, if not three or four.

                                                            ii.      Supplies.

1.       A craftable hutch to house them.

a.       Ten cedar firewood, four fir firewood, four metal scrap, nesting material, six hours (intervals of one hour)

2.      Rabbits, two of them caught in craftable traps.

3.      Water, given every 2-3 days.

4.      Food, given every 2-3 days (rosehips, cattail stalk, nuts, berries, seeds, barely, and herbs)

5.      Cleaning. Cleaning the cage and replacing the nesting material every 4-6 days (cloth, newspaper,

c.       Mice? I think this could have a lot of potential.  Mice could be a problem inside specific shelters and not outdoors; they eat the food and decay clothing and other materials.  You can catch then in a craftable trap (live or dead), and eat them or keep up to three in a craftable cage which you can interact with.  They will have similar needs to rabbits and produce offspring.

6.      Working on Projects.

a.       Build a treehouse, woodshed, food cellar – that keeps it fresher longer (in a fixed location that the supplies are sitting and done in intervals like the wolf coat).

b.      Patch up holes at your base shelter.

7.      Stargazing and Cloud Watching.

a.       This action will increase vulnerability to wildlife and allow you to get very cold quickly.

8.      Reading.

a.       Rereading will not be as satisfying to morale and books will eventually not satisfy morale if read too many times.

                                                              i.      Regular books can be read.

                                                            ii.      Textbooks (found in school classrooms) can boost and perhaps unlock craftables.

                                                          iii.      Manuals can be found inside the radio hut, gas station, processing plant, camp office, and in plane wreckage and can unlock craftables.

                                                          iv.      Bibles are immune to reread decay and can be found at the church and in motel side tables.

                                                            v.      Magazines will also fall apart as they are read over and over.

1.      Nature magazines will unlock new whittling figurines.

2.      Cooking magazines unlock new cooking recipes.

3.      Pop culture magazine have less boost than other types, but have a crossword puzzle or Sudoku. (pens and pencils will be hard to find, but last a while)

9.      Doodling.

a.       A chalkboard in a school classroom can be doodled on, but chalk must be found which quickly decays.

b.      A rare sketchbook can be found in a school art room and can be used up to 15 times, then can be used to make tinder plugs.

1

1.      Puzzles and Games. (done without animations)

a.       Crosswords and Sudoku are mentioned above in magazines, but should also be available in newspapers.  They shouldn’t be always available or even half completed.

b.      A jigsaw puzzle can be found in a specific location (perhaps the farmhouse somewhere near the crib) and will require a table to complete in several intervals.  Once complete, it can be placed back in the box or left out to enjoy.

c.       The ultra-rare deck of cards can be used to play solitaire, free cell, and spider.

Edited by RaeRiceSimmer
added ideas from my notes
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Thanks for sharing your ideas and providing the detailed breakdowns. We've had discussion on several of these topics in the past (I'll be sure to add your notes to theirs), but it's always interesting to have a new perspective. 

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You may want to check out my earlier discussion thread on morale as well:

There are some really good pros and cons listed for adding a morale system in the game in the comments. As well as a little confusion on morale vs morals :)

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Morale will just add another gauge, completely unnecessary, to the game and force players into certain behavioral patterns to keep it up. Hardy a quality addition. Different people react to different stimuli differently and measuring everything by same standards would only ruin immersion.

It already shows when measuring responses on forum between different players, how different approaches players take when playing.

Honey could be an interesting addition, altho chances of being stung at -20C, especially in strong wind, would be like 0.

Moisturizers seem to be an overkill, purely cosmetic feature. Never used one, even tho winters around here sometimes can be rather cold.

Basket is also rather weird idea. Far more logical would be using tin cans, that would also have a lot of various usages.

Birds dont lay eggs in the winter. And during winter things like lard seem to be better idea than seeds or nuts(how birds are supposed to feed on nuts to begin with, not to mention that those are far better to be used as food for player).

Churches generally have organs, not pianos. Also one in DP seem to be rather small to have either. There is a school building somewhere in the LD ?

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41 minutes ago, Dirmagnos said:

Morale will just add another gauge, completely unnecessary, to the game and force players into certain behavioral patterns to keep it up. Hardy a quality addition. Different people react to different stimuli differently and measuring everything by same standards would only ruin immersion.

It already shows when measuring responses on forum between different players, how different approaches players take when playing.

Honey could be an interesting addition, altho chances of being stung at -20C, especially in strong wind, would be like 0.

Moisturizers seem to be an overkill, purely cosmetic feature. Never used one, even tho winters around here sometimes can be rather cold.

Basket is also rather weird idea. Far more logical would be using tin cans, that would also have a lot of various usages.

Birds dont lay eggs in the winter. And during winter things like lard seem to be better idea than seeds or nuts(how birds are supposed to feed on nuts to begin with, not to mention that those are far better to be used as food for player).

Churches generally have organs, not pianos. Also one in DP seem to be rather small to have either. There is a school building somewhere in the LD ?

As I mentioned above, considering the many ways you can boost morale, it would hardly force behavioral patterns because you can do many actions (that you would probably do anyway) and the player wouldn't be forced to "deal with it" in a standardized way.  Some will whittle, others will feed birds.  

You're very lucky to have never needed lotion during winter because my skin cracks and even bleeds sometimes and I live in NW Indiana. I use lotion for burns and cuts as well, completely medical and not cosmetic.

Many birds lay eggs as early as March, like the time of year it is now - it snowed yesterday.

I've been to several churches in my lifetime and most of them only had pianos - and multiple ones at that.  Now, catholic churches generally have organs. I also visited a small church, just slightly larger than the stone church that had a piano by the pulpit.  

There is no school building, it's just another suggestion. 

 

 

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From my earlier post my opinion remains the same:

If morale can be modeled without adding an extra bar than it would be worth it. Otherwise, as @Dirmagnos said you just have another bar to optimize. Personally I think it can be done in a way consistent with the other mechanics in the game. Others, of course, disagree :D

Your ideas on a whole are interesting. Most have been discussed previously as well especially honey and how getting it may impact long term play. Moisturizers I wouldn't bother with (just one more thing to keep track of), berries would likely be gone by this time of year and if you wanted bird eggs you'd need to climb the tree to the nest. There are bird species, like grey jays, who lay their eggs in late winter but you're not going to find them near a bird feeder.

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Lotion seem to be the same thing as whole morale concept, personal preference and/or physique. Even tho winters lately has been becoming warmer, on occasion we do get couple of weeks of proper winter, like snow and minus 20-25C. Love it.

Many birds may lay eggs as early as March, but its not March in the game. Its middle of the winter(maybe end, but still winter). Birds may not possess human level of "intelligence", but they wont bother with whole nesting process under conditions that will kill their eggs for sure.

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I'm not sure about the lotion. I suspect rendering bear fat (or salmon fat) would result in the same thing, though maybe a bit smelly . . .

On the other hand, I'd kill for a bar of soap. Just plain, everyday soap. Being able to fill those tubs with hot water and wash up, or even do a sponge bath in the kitchen sink, would not only improve morale, but also improve health!! Once people started taking baths regularly, public health improved considerably, especially cases of impetigo and other skin infections that could lead to worse conditions if left untreated. Once again, rendering bear fat and mixing it with wood ash -- I'm not sure of the RL recipe, but I think for TLD purposes this would be a great addition!

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3 hours ago, hauteecolerider said:

Once people started taking baths regularly, public health improved considerably, especially cases of impetigo

This intrigued me. I have a book that documents the problem of the association with cleanliness with health or dirtiness with illness; in fact, it's the opposite; exposure to environmental factors like germs can actually boost immunity and resistance.

Certainly soap was a great advance during the early years of surgery when we became familiar with the causes of disease. Humans had soaps at least as far back as Roman times, probably even earlier than that. Would you mind sharing the connection of disease spread and the introduction of soap? Just for curiosity.

I am in favor of soap for the game. Soap is a cultural thing. Many indigenous cultures did not bother with compulsive cleanliness. A good old smoke bath or sweat bath was good enough. The body odor thing is a big cultural thing associated with affluence. What it does have a lot to do with is feeling good about yourself. When you are camping or lost in the woods, after a few days, things start to feel uncomfortable. Part of this might have to do with our habit of wearing underwear!! It's just so refreshing to being to get clean. And feeling good is very important for survival. It's the mental game.

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Cleanliness is actually rather important.

Proper air circulation affects how effective warm clothes may be. Sweating prevents skin ability to "breath", resulting in faster fatigue buildup. Rashes are far more likely to develop on dirty skin. Etc.

While bath is an obvious overkill, but taking a piece of rag, some water and wipe oneself clean would go a long way in terms of survival.

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10 hours ago, hauteecolerider said:

I'm not sure about the lotion. I suspect rendering bear fat (or salmon fat) would result in the same thing, though maybe a bit smelly . . .

On the other hand, I'd kill for a bar of soap. Just plain, everyday soap. Being able to fill those tubs with hot water and wash up, or even do a sponge bath in the kitchen sink, would not only improve morale, but also improve health!! Once people started taking baths regularly, public health improved considerably, especially cases of impetigo and other skin infections that could lead to worse conditions if left untreated. Once again, rendering bear fat and mixing it with wood ash -- I'm not sure of the RL recipe, but I think for TLD purposes this would be a great addition!

I thought about the lotion a lot, but balms would probably make more sense considering you can use them on wounds as well.  I like the idea of soap as well, but I feel that maybe it's asking too much to use a bathtub.  Sponge baths do make a lot of sense though.  Or perhaps a solar shower? I use a sea to summit pocket shower when I go on extended hiking trips. It should raise health as well - imagine getting a cold in the game!! That could be interesting.  Treatment could be tea and soup?

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7 hours ago, SteveP said:

This intrigued me. I have a book that documents the problem of the association with cleanliness with health or dirtiness with illness; in fact, it's the opposite; exposure to environmental factors like germs can actually boost immunity and resistance.

To oversimplify an extremely complex (and much researched) topic: The degree of cleanliness is what matters.

Actually living in dirt and mud, especially in areas without proper wastewater systems (like in middle age European cities or slums in developing contries) is indeed correlated with a much higher risk for infections of course. As your immune system is massively challenged all the time fighting various different germs at once (not only bacteria, but also viruses and parasites), it's pretty likely that it will "lose" some of it's battles every now and then. Losing in this context doesn't mean immediate death, but sickness and fever and a higher susceptibility to further infections.

Using antibacterial spray to disinfect your whole home every day is almost equally much of a catastrophe for the immune system on the other hand. If you create yourself a completely germfree environment at home or work, your immune system lacks the proper training to deal with naturally occuring germs in general - both harmless and harmful ones. As paradox it may seem, this will make you more susceptible to infections as well.

So the best thing to do regarding hygiene (and almost all other things in life) is not to panic, but to steer kind of a middle course.

Keeping your house clean (but not germfree), washing your hands with normal (not antiseptic) soap before you eat and taking a shower once per day (or even just once a week, from an immunological point of view even the latter is completely unproblematic) is completely sufficient to stay healthy. Everyone gets the cold or the flu every once in a while, just accept that and don't fool yourself into thinking you could avoid this by using antiseptic soap and cleaning agents ten times a day.

If you have children, it's also important to get them into contact with as many antigens as possible during the first three years of their lives in order to avoid allergies. Give them a balanced and diverse diet, go on a farm holiday if you have the possibility, let them play in the dirt every now and then or simply walk in the woods with them once a month. Everything that challenges and trains their immune system (without overexerting it) is good.

Nothing is worse than a child growing up in a completely germfree environment - it's prone to suffer from both allergies against harmless stuff (pollen, animals, food, whatever) and susceptibility against harmful diseases later on. :winky:

I once used the following metaphor to explain the connections between infant immune system, microbiome, harmful germs and autoimmune diseases to my family:

" The immune system of children is a bit like a young dog.  If you train said dog properly and keep him occupied, he will protect the child against its foes, but be nice towards harmless people and friends. But if the dog isn't trained at all and has no tasks whatsoever, it may tear apart the curtains out of pure boredom and possibly even bite the child or its friends."

 

TL, DR:

Both too much and too little cleanliness is bad.

Edited by Scyzara
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17 minutes ago, Scyzara said:

The degree of cleanliness is what matters.

TL, DR:

Both too much and too little cleanliness is bad.

Lice preferring clean hair is a good example of how cleanliness isn't always what it seems. To make the game a bit more realistic (and fun) some factors should be considered, like you mentioned, if cleanliness was added.

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26 minutes ago, Scyzara said:

Nothing is worse than a child growing up in a completely germfree environment - it's prone to suffer from both allergies against harmless stuff (pollen, animals, food, whatever) and susceptibility against harmful diseases later on. :winky:

Tried telling my sister that for yrs with her 3, she never listened.  The pathogens work in the same way with all these products on the market to kill em off they grow resistant and we end up with superbugs, modern houses too with double glazing etc are just as bad being almost hermetically sealed.

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I agree with the points made above regarding soap. My thinking actually in this situation is that the handmade soap is rarely antibacterial - it just decreases the amount of dirt and opportunistic pathogens on the skin. Foraging for food and firewood in the wild will make one prone to superficial scratches, as my attempts at gardening will attest! The worst animal inflicted infections I've suffered have occurred when I couldn't rinse the wounds out immediately. I've never been one to use antibiotics unless I'm prone with a raging fever for more than a couple of days - at which point any viruses have passed on and only secondary bacterial infections linger. 

I just think that sponge baths with a bucket or sink full of warm water would go a long way towards making one feel better as well as more resistant to infections, and this would be manageable within the confines of the game. It's bad enough that we don't have toilet paper and have to resort to cloth, moss or inner bark . . .

In any case, anyone with preexisting medical conditions wouldn't survive the Long Dark in real life anyway - I know I certainly wouldn't!

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Yeah, I wouldn't favour your chances if you're diabetic or have another illness that requires constant treatment. :frown:

As far as cleanliness is concerned... a smoke bath and hand and face washing is really all you need. The energy and resources to make a bath is simply ludicrous within the context of the game.

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19 hours ago, hauteecolerider said:

I'm not sure about the lotion. I suspect rendering bear fat (or salmon fat) would result in the same thing, though maybe a bit smelly . . .

On the other hand, I'd kill for a bar of soap. Just plain, everyday soap. Being able to fill those tubs with hot water and wash up, or even do a sponge bath in the kitchen sink, would not only improve morale, but also improve health!! Once people started taking baths regularly, public health improved considerably, especially cases of impetigo and other skin infections that could lead to worse conditions if left untreated. Once again, rendering bear fat and mixing it with wood ash -- I'm not sure of the RL recipe, but I think for TLD purposes this would be a great addition!

There is already soap in the game. I have definitely seen soap in the Trappers Homestead, and several other bars in various restrooms.

The thing is, like many other bits of "scenery" in the game (like the various pots and pans and the utensils that would be found logically in many kitchens), we can't use it..... for some reason.

15 hours ago, SteveP said:

This intrigued me. I have a book that documents the problem of the association with cleanliness with health or dirtiness with illness; in fact, it's the opposite; exposure to environmental factors like germs can actually boost immunity and resistance.

Certainly soap was a great advance during the early years of surgery when we became familiar with the causes of disease. Humans had soaps at least as far back as Roman times, probably even earlier than that. Would you mind sharing the connection of disease spread and the introduction of soap? Just for curiosity.

I am in favor of soap for the game. Soap is a cultural thing. Many indigenous cultures did not bother with compulsive cleanliness. A good old smoke bath or sweat bath was good enough. The body odor thing is a big cultural thing associated with affluence. What it does have a lot to do with is feeling good about yourself. When you are camping or lost in the woods, after a few days, things start to feel uncomfortable. Part of this might have to do with our habit of wearing underwear!! It's just so refreshing to being to get clean. And feeling good is very important for survival. It's the mental game.

Humanity has known about soap for many thousands of years, at least as far back as the Neolithic, and probably longer.

Surrounding your body with smoke will kill most bacteria/"bugs" that live on your body. 

Body odor isn't caused by uncleanliness per se, it is caused by the life processes of bacteria that live on the warm/wet parts of the body. AS they start to live and die, they give off "funk". After a couple days of funkiness, they stop giving off the funk, and you start to stink less and less. 

And, contrary to popular opinion, "Medieval people" didn't "like" to be dirty. The Roman practice of public bathing actually continued for several centuries after Rome's decline. The reason it stopped was mostly economic, and part social. With the collapse of the Roman Empire, more and more land in Europe was clear-cut for agriculture. That left less wood for burning. Several public bathhouses tried using coal for heating, only to find that it made people sick. Plus, with subsistence agriculture being so labor-intensive, most people had less and less time to sit around and do nothing (ie bathe). Finally, Roman-era bathhouses were strongly associated with prostitution, something the up-and-coming Catholic Church wasn't exactly fond of.

I know that I hate to be dirty, even out in the woods. Whenever I go camping with my Scout Troop, I usually take a "rag-bath" and shave preferably every other night. It isn't that hard, and keeps me happy and feeling good.

4 hours ago, cekivi said:

Yeah, I wouldn't favour your chances if you're diabetic or have another illness that requires constant treatment. :frown:

As far as cleanliness is concerned... a smoke bath and hand and face washing is really all you need. The energy and resources to make a bath is simply ludicrous within the context of the game.

Don't forget about the crotch, and the feet, and under the arms. Basically, anywhere where it can get warm and wet. Oh, and don't forget about the mouth/teeth!

Personal hygiene is actually really freaken important in survival, something that many armchair survivalists don't seem to understand. Getting a rash or, god-forbid, an actual skin infection will kill you, or, at the very least, severely hamper your chances for survival. Not to mention, getting a skin rash or infection will make your morale plummet like nothing else.

And it isn't even that hard to keep yourself clean in the wilderness, either. Take a container of water, boil it, then dip in a rag and scrub under your arms, around your crotch, and around your feet. If you have got soap, even better. Let your clothing sit in the smoke from a campfire for a little while, and chew on the end of a stick until it splinters, then "floss" with it.

Edited by Boston123
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1 hour ago, cekivi said:

True @Boston123. I totally forgot about arms, groin and teeth. Teeth especially. Imagine having an cavity or a cracked molar in this setting :crying:

I kind of forgot about them since your chompers don't degrade in the game :)

Was something i gave some thought to a while back, don't think it made it to one of my brain fats on here though, looking after your bit's, pit's, feet and mitts after seeing the jug, basin and washcloth in Trappers Homestead.  Not so much in terms of a morale bar but condition bonus and to aid a good nights rest much like a cup of tea.

Also thought of dental hygiene too, perhaps harvesting birch tar and campfire embers to make chewing gum to counter a random first aid alert.

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One of the huge steps forward was the invention of sewage systems. The Romans had them but during the middle ages, things were very bad with rats everywhere and fleas spreading the black plague.

I think in Canada we don't tend to think about the humidity problems of hot climates as much. We peel off clothing to avoid sweating. I totally agree especially wet feet are a potential killer because any wound can become infected.

Sponge baths would be nice as well as shaving (or whatever the ladies do)

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Cleanliness, as status, could have little to no effect on its own, but act as modifier to other conditions/actions, eg sleeping effectiveness, food poisoning chance modifier, tiredness buildup modifier, infection chance from bites/lacerations, etc.

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6 hours ago, SteveP said:

One of the huge steps forward was the invention of sewage systems. The Romans had them but during the middle ages, things were very bad with rats everywhere and fleas spreading the black plague.

I think in Canada we don't tend to think about the humidity problems of hot climates as much. We peel off clothing to avoid sweating. I totally agree especially wet feet are a potential killer because any wound can become infected.

Sponge baths would be nice as well as shaving (or whatever the ladies do)

As a lady myself, I can assure you that shaving would be the first to go if I suddenly found myself in a survival situation!

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On 3/11/2016 at 5:17 AM, SteveP said:

Sponge baths would be nice as well as shaving (or whatever the ladies do)

As a lady, I feel like there is a particularly bothersome thing that would be horrible to have to deal with in a survival situation; especially with all the predators roaming about.  Please keep that element of realism out of the game, thanks.

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